Hunting Tips
  • Tell us exactly what your expectations are in terms of trophy quality for each animal that is important to you. It is our job to be certain that you will have the opportunity to take an animal of that quality. Not every place in Southern Africa is great for every species. Even if a species is listed in a brochure it doesn't mean that they will always have the size animal you expect. Be specific.
  • Don't go "over gunned." Anything from a .270 Winchester to a .375 H&H will suffice for our Southern Africa plains game. Bring a rifle that you like to shoot, and practice with it out to 300 yards. If you can consistently hit a 8 inch circle at 200 yards you are ready. Remember that shots can be from 80-300 yards
  • If you are going to be pursuing any of Africa's larger animals or dangerous game use a .375 H&H caliber rifle or larger. Make sure you practice with it. If you are recoil sensitive get a rifle with a muzzle brake and a mercury recoil reducer. There is no sense in hunting with a rifle that you are more afraid of than the game you are going to pursue.
  • Be certain to disclose any food allergies, or strong preferences that you have. Us folks in South Africa want you to be comfortable and want to spoil you. Let them. Keep in mind that the hunting areas in South Africa are usually many miles from the nearest store, so we need to plan meals ahead of time.
  • Bring along good quality hunting boots that are already broken in. Don't risk ruining your hunt by getting a bunch of blisters from those new boots you just had to buy two days before your trip.
  • Be sure to disclose any physical limitations that you may have
  • Wear darker colours than a standard tan or khaki. Dark greens / browns and camo are best. The lighter tan colours tend to reflect light more which spooks game.
  • Bring bug repellent. The bugs in South Africa are very tolerable in most parts, however anytime you are near water or during the rainy season, they can be a lot worse. There are many areas in South Africa where the bugs are downright oppressive and can even be dangerous (carrying malaria) so bring the bug stuff!
  • Speaking of malaria, there are many areas in Africa where malaria is prevalent. Most of South Africa and Namibia are not areas of concern. However if you are travelling to other places in Africa such as Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania, and others you should consult your doctor on one of the anti-malaria drugs on the market.
  • Bring a jacket. Even though the weather can be very mild during the hunting season in the daytime, it can be downright cold at night and in the early morning.
  • Many safari operators have phones in the lodge you will be staying in, or in their private home. If you want to stay in touch with your family during the hunt, set up a long distance phone card BEFORE you leave the US. The best way to handle this is to email home and tell them what time to call you with the phone card
  • Don't tip the camp or lodge staff directly. Make sure to check with the PH first. Many of them prefer to tip on payday. This is a custom that you would be wise to observe. It is ok to tell your skinner or tracker that you gave the PH something for them and to tell them how much, but do not tip directly unless you are specifically told that it is ok to do so.
  • Bring a good camera. The whole trip is about taking pictures. Don't skimp when purchasing a camera. Buy a good "point and shoot" camera that won't be difficult to carry around with you in the bush. Your friends will never tire of them.